Wake Up Wake Up.

Waking up to the opioid crisis is a long-awaited wake up call for many people.

As you know, there have been reports of overdose deaths in Wilmington.

While these deaths are very rare, the health impacts have been felt by many.

Some of the more pressing health issues are chronic pain, high blood pressure, obesity, asthma and heart disease.

As we approach the one-year anniversary of the first wave of deaths, I want to share a look at what is happening in Wilmington and across the country.

Opioid overdose rates have dropped over the last year in Wilmington, which has seen a decrease in the number of opioid overdose deaths, according to the Wilmington Department of Health.

In December 2017, there were 4,077 opioid overdose cases and 1,812 deaths.

In January 2018, the number was down to 4,062 cases and 744 deaths.

At the same time, the rate of deaths dropped in the same month.

This is a significant improvement in the city and the state, said Department of Public Health Director Dr. Julie Johnson.

Johnson also noted that Wilmington has been one of the states most successful in reducing the opioid overdose crisis, with an estimated decrease in opioid deaths of more than 1,000 deaths in the first six months of 2018.

“I can’t say enough good about Wilmington.

We have worked very hard to reduce our rate of opioid-related deaths,” Johnson said.

“The city is also home to the first state-of-the-art overdose response center, which is one of only two in the nation.”

In May 2018, Wilmington had 1,700 opioid overdose victims, up from 2,000 the previous month.

While there is a lot of work to be done in Wilmington to keep our city and state on track, Johnson noted that there is still work to do to make our community safer.

“We have a long way to go, but we’re making progress.

I think we’re starting to see the first signs of the long-term impact,” Johnson told TechRadars audience.

“This is the first time I’ve seen such a large drop in the opioid-involved overdose death rate.”

This has been the trend of many cities across the U.S. for the past few years.

In fact, Johnson said Wilmington was one of about a dozen states with a decrease of opioid overdoses.

Johnson pointed out that the decrease in overdose deaths is in line with the national trend.

In 2017, nearly half of the nation’s overdose deaths were linked to opioids.

There is a growing recognition that opioids are a serious health issue and one that can be prevented by using safer, more effective drugs, Johnson added.

“More people are waking up to this.

That’s good news.

This has a ripple effect and we need to use it to our advantage,” Johnson continued.

“For instance, we’ve been working to change our code of ethics and policy.

We need to change how we talk to patients, doctors and others about opioids, and we’re seeing positive results.

In addition to opioids and overdoses, the department also said that the Wilmington Fire Department has responded to an additional 1,749 calls related to the use of the opioid OxyContin. “

When it comes to opioids, we’re going to continue to have to address the opioid problem,” she added.

In addition to opioids and overdoses, the department also said that the Wilmington Fire Department has responded to an additional 1,749 calls related to the use of the opioid OxyContin.

Johnson said that Wilmington is also seeing a drop in violent crime.

In 2016, violent crime dropped by nearly 8 percent compared to 2017, which resulted in a reduction in homicides in the Wilmington area.

Johnson noted, however, that the crime is still increasing.

“There’s a lot going on,” Johnson noted.

“Some of the most recent crime is related to this opioid crisis.

We continue to see people getting into fights, and that is not healthy for Wilmington or the city.

In March 2018, Mayor Dwight Jones signed a bill that will require local governments to post signs around the city saying that a drug overdose is an opioid overdose and that the only safe way to handle someone with a prescription is to administer Narcan. “

If you look at crime, it is actually going down,” she said.

In March 2018, Mayor Dwight Jones signed a bill that will require local governments to post signs around the city saying that a drug overdose is an opioid overdose and that the only safe way to handle someone with a prescription is to administer Narcan.

The sign will also be prominently displayed in every building and at all entrances to public transportation.

The new signs are currently being reviewed and will be approved by the City Council before they go into effect.

While Wilmington’s opioid crisis has been on the upswing for some time, Johnson told the audience that there are still many issues to address.

“While there is great progress being made in Wilmington,” Johnson added, “we need to continue working on our community and working on what we need as a community to do so that we can be safe for our citizens.”

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